Meet Rev. Phil

Rev. Phil is a real minister. He is a third generation minister – like his grandfather and father.

He earned a Master of Divinity degree from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, IL in 1990. He was the pastor of several churches for a number of years. Now, he is a full-time wedding minister. All he does is marry couples – 125 weddings a year! Learn about his “religion” — and why that is in quotes.

At the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, he was a political science major. It was there that he met Jesus, met the woman who would become his wife, and first had the desire to be a pastor.

In June of 1984, he married the love of his life and his best friend (which is still true) — Pamela. They got married on a hot day in an un-air-conditioned church in Antioch. The reception was at her parents’ huge back yard near Fox Lake.

He enjoys:

  • reading two newspapers a day — the New York Times (mostly read on his iPad) and Chicago Tribune
  • going to the movies — with the goal each year to see all the Oscar nominees in the top 6 categories (so all the best picture nominees, best directors, actors in each category, etc.)
  • watching the Chicago Bears
  • outdoor concerts at the Chicago Botanic Garden in the summer

He and his wife, Pamela, enjoy good food and wine (Jesus’ first miracle was to turn water into wine — at a wedding :>), good conversation, TiVo (Survivor, Daily Show, Friday’s Tonight Show), being involved at their church and, most of all, Jesus.

gollu

Rev. Phil has been told a number of times that he has a voice for radio. He thinks he has the face for it, too.

What were his parents thinking? If you combine his names, “Phil” and “Landers” you get “philander” which Merriam-Webster dictionary defines as “to be sexually unfaithful to one’s wife” — an adulterer. He has been faithful to his wife all these years. But it is an ironic name for a wedding minister, isn’t it? (He was named after two of his grandfathers — one was Philip and the other was John.)

He takes the things of God seriously but not himself. If you ever get too full of yourself, talk to your spouse. As Garrison Keillor put it, “We not only marry our best friend — but also our best critic.”